Dental Myth Busting with Jannali Dental Care

myth busters true or false

Tooth be told, there’s a lot of misconceptions when it comes to proper dental care and these sometimes fuel the lack of excitement when you see an upcoming dental appointment on your calendar.

And while its true that going to the dentist isn’t all fun and games, knowing the truth behind certain myths will certainly help your chances of maintaining good oral health.

👉Here’s FIVE of our favourite dental myth-busters:

1. If your teeth are white and look and feel fine, then you don’t need to see the dentist:

FALSE. Sure, it’s great to have healthy looking teeth, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a pesky hole forming that you cannot see or feel.

Dental visits and cleanings every 6-12 months will help keep your teeth looking and feeling healthy; and help to catch any beginning stages of gum disease or a cavity before it leads to pain.

Any person who tells you they only see a dentist when a tooth hurts, is doing themselves a big disservice. Straight perfectly white teeth are definitely not a substitute for poor oral health care.

2. They’re just baby teeth and will fall out anyway, so no need to see a dentist:

FALSE. One of the biggest misconceptions is that baby teeth don’t really matter, since they “just fall out”anyway.

On the contrary, baby teeth play a huge role in guiding the adult teeth in both direction and health. They foster good nutrition through proper chewing, and aid in speech development.

3. You don’t have to floss if you’re brushing regularly:

FALSE. When you don’t floss, you’re at risk for two major dental issues in your mouth: gingivitis, and cavities between your teeth, and you are not able to properly remove dental plaque buildup.

Brushing only cleans the visible parts of your teeth. Whereas flossing gets to all those tricky hard to reach areas.

Oh and brushing harder does not give you a better clean, that’s another myth! It can actually erode tooth enamel. We recommend using a soft-bristled brush and gently massaging your teeth and gums. Harder is NOT better.

Using an electric toothbrush does not stop the need for flossing either. It is still super important.

4. You can’t go to the dentist while you’re pregnant:

FALSE. Some mums-to-be assume that the dentist should be avoided while pregnant.

Tthere is no scientific basis for this. In fact, the vast majority of dental procedures are completely safe for pregnant women and the babies they’re carrying.

As we’ve said many times, our mouth is the gateway to our body. Bacteria, infection and other problems here can easily affect the rest of your health, which may affect your baby.

Additionally, pregnancy results in hormonal changes that can cause tooth and gum problems, so getting a dental check-up during pregnancy is not only safe but also incredibly important!

5. You can dissolve a tooth in Coca Cola In 24 hours:

FALSE. This is actually a big urban myth.

While there’s no question that Coke will deteriorate and stain your teeth, leaving a tooth in a coke can for 24 hours will not dissolve an entire tooth.

Coke is acidic and as much as I dislike what it does, it simply can’t make a tooth disappear. But remember, always keep soft drinks in moderation.

So there you go, that’s our top FIVE myth busters! 😜

Oral health education is a big part of what makes us tick at Jannali Dental Care. The more you know, the healthier your smile.

Avoiding decay with a sweet tooth

managng a sweet tooth at jannali dental care

Yes it would be VERY easy for me to say “just avoid sugar”.  But in an age of fast food, chocolate thick-shakes and Donut King, how does one do that?  It’s simply not realistic.

We live with sugar. It’s here and it is  not going away.

Here are my top three tips for preventing tooth decay if you have a sweet tooth.  Hope you find these helpful.

Tip Number One: ORAL HYGIENE

This one is a no-brainer.  Brush your teeth twice a day.

Small circles, angled at 45 degrees to your teeth and gently massage your gums while you brush. This mechanically removes any food residue still stuck to your teeth.

Use floss to clean the areas between your teeth. This is important as a toothbrush cannot reach these spots and food can easily get lodged and sit here for days causing bad breath, decay and gum infection.

When using floss make sure you contact the surfaces of your teeth to again mechanically remove bits of food stuck to them.

As much as I’d love you to floss every day, even once a week is better then nothing.

Tip Number Two: SUBSTITUTION

If you cook your own cakes and biscuits and jams, then try substituting white sugar with something like Xylitol.

This is a natural sugar and many studies have come out recently showing it actually STOPS decay from progressing through your teeth. It doesn’t spike blood sugar or insulin, starves the plaque-producing bacteria in your mouth and feeds friendly microbes in your digestive system.

There are also sugar alternatives out there for bodybuilders and diabetics so have a look at these products and see if they are suitable for you.

Another tip is avoid fruit juices and swap for the raw fruit version. Have an apple instead of slowly sipping on apple juice. Sugary juices are definitely not great for your teeth.

Tip Number Three: TIMING

Lots of studies have shown it is not necessarily the AMOUNT of sugar you have, but rather how FREQUENTLY you have it.

This is because when you frequently consume sugar throughout the day, you are not giving your saliva enough time to replenish itself and buffer the mouth from the acidity created from consuming the sugar.

So if you are going to have sugary foods and drinks, try and consume them during or after a main meal. Once you have had the sugary meal or drink, then that is it.   Don’t snack on sugary foods all day.

Of course during the course of every day, make sure you are having lots of veggies, protein and water.

I hope you have found this blog helpful.  These 3 tips are simple and pretty easy to follow – and they will help minimise the chance of decay.

If you need a caring dentist that won’t make you feel bad about having a sweet tooth, then give us a call at Jannali Dental Care on 9528 9204 OR book your appointment online right here.

We certainly won’t judge your sugar intake, but we may give you some tips to help manage it.

Understanding gum disease. What to look for and how to treat it.

treating gum disease at Jannali Dental Care

You would not live with a chronic eye or ear infection, would you?

Yet 45% of the population over 65 years live with a chronic infection known as gum disease, or periodontitis.

If left untreated, gum disease can lead to tooth loss and the infection can actually spread throughout the body. Research shows that gum disease is associate with heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and even pre-term delivery in pregnancy.

From these studies, it has been shown that men with gum disease are 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer, 54% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30% more likely to develop blood cancers. Very good reasons to take care of your gums.

Most people don’t realise they have this disease – but it is a serious, and very treatable, infection.

The good news is that gum disease can be treated!

For years it was thought that the bacteria linked to gum disease was linked to other disease in the body. Current research now shows that in fact it’s inflammation which is responsible for the link. Therefore treating gum disease and the inflammation will not only help manage periodontal diseases, but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

Gum disease is often silent. That means that the symptoms may not actually appear until the disease has advanced to a more severe stage.

What are the warning signs?

 

Red, swollen, or tender gums – or other pain in your mouth
Bleeding while brushing, flossing or eating hard food (don’t panic, some bleeding while flossing is ok)
Pus between your gums and teeth
Sores in your mouth
Gums that are receding or pulling away from your teeth
Loose or separating teeth
Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth
A change to the way your teeth fit together in your mouth.

What is the treatment?

 

The treatment for gum disease depends on the severity.

For starters, coming to see us at Jannali Dental Care and having a full checkup with one of our dentists, is a great way to assess your gum health.

You can get your gums healthy again. If you have mild to moderate disease, it can be treated simply with regular brushing, flossing, mouthwash, and regular check-ups with us including frequent dental cleanings. It may also help to review your diet and lifestyle choices. Quitting smoking would also go along way towards healthier gums.

With more severe cases, specific treatment is required. The treatment can vary from sub gingival cleaning to referral for treatment by a periodontist for severe infections.

If gum disease is not caught soon enough, sometimes it is necessary to replace natural teeth with implants, restorations, bridges, or even dentures.

Remember, gum disease IS preventable. But let’s make sure we catch it early.

If you have any concerns about your gums, or any oral health issue, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option. Your teeth are important so let us help you keep them ship-shape. ❤️

Dental x-rays, the who, the what, and the why?

dental x-ray at Jannali Dental Care

A dental x-ray is one of the most important diagnostic tools in a dentist’s arsenal. And they are safer and simpler than ever before –  quick, painless, and modern x-rays emit very low-radiation. 

And, most importantly, an x-ray allow us to assess a number of dental conditions.  Even though we may have a keen eye and loads of experience, there are still some things that even the very best dentist cannot see with just the naked eye.

What are dental x-rays?

Have you noticed how quickly an x-ray appears on the dentist’s screen?  Modern x-rays are digital and INSTANT.  Pretty amazing technology.

Not only do they allow for immediate viewing and diagnosis, they emit around 30% to 40% less radiation than traditional dental x-rays.

Dental x-rays are used for check-ups (usually every two years) and for diagnostic purposes.  We don’t need to take x-rays at every appointment.

Specialist x-rays like OPG and CBCT (described below), are used when more detailed or specialised imagery is needed.

CBCT

A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or Cone Beam Scan, is a precise method of x-ray used to create a 3D image of a patient’s mouth, teeth and jaw. This type of x-ray can be used for root canal, dental implants and gum disease assessment.

OPG

An orthopantomogram (try pronouncing that one!), or OPG, is a specialist x-ray which provides a 360-degree view of the teeth, jawbones, joints and sinuses. This type of x-ray may be required for braces preparation, dental implants, investigating gum disease, wisdom tooth removal or gaining a detailed picture of how a patient’s teeth fit into their jaw.

What are dental x-rays useful for?

Even the most experienced and eagle-eyed dentist can’t spot everything with the naked eye. An x-ray can help detect dental problems which are hidden beneath the surface or establish the extent of an infection.

Decay

If tooth decay is suspected by your dentist an x-ray can confirm its presence and the extent of the decay.

Infections and Abscesses

Abscesses and infections can be detected using dental x-rays. While your dentist may be able to establish that you have an infection during a regular check-up, a dental x-ray will establish the extent of the infection or abscess.

It gives us a much better idea of what is going on in your mouth.

Preparation and progress

Dental x-rays can be used to help prepare and assess the progress of patients for things such as braces, wisdom teeth extraction, dental implants and other cosmetic procedures which require a clear and detailed picture.

Are dental x-rays safe?

A dental x-ray every two years, or even more frequently, poses no health risk and the benefits to your dental health far outweigh any risk from exposure to the radiation emitted by the x-ray.

Modern digital x-rays, as opposed to traditional radiographic x-rays, emit a much lower level of radiation. At Jannali Dental Care, we only use digital x-rays – but if in doubt, always check with your dentist.

When are children able to have dental x-rays?

There is no general rule about when children can start to have x-rays.

A dentist will typically administer an x-ray on a child if they suspect particular dental health issues, or if that child is at high-risk of developing a dental issue.

Radiation levels can be lowered for child x-rays, but they are not given as a routine necessity as is the case in an adult check-up, usually only when they are needed as a diagnostic tool.

Are dental x-rays dangerous for pregnant women?

The Australian Dental Association says that x-rays are safe during all stages of pregnancy.

However, extra precautions are recommended during the first three terms of pregnancy and generally at Jannali Dental Care, our dentists will avoid routine preventative x-rays during pregnancy and only use them if required for more urgent diagnostic purposes.

The patient does of course have the right to refuse an x-ray if she feels it is not in her best interest.

How often should I get a dental x-ray?

Dental x-rays are recommended every two years as part of your check-up. Prevention is always better than cure and dental x-rays can pick up issues which can be missed by the eyes of even the most experienced dentist.

Some patients may require x-rays more frequently if they have a history of tooth decay or are at a high risk of dental problems.

X-rays are also administered if a patient presents with pain or other symptoms of infection or decay.

An xray can be just the thing that identifies and allows us to fix the problem that may be well-hidden to the naked eye.

If you have any concerns about dental xrays or any oral health issue, and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option.

Thumb sucking. Can it impact my child’s teeth?

Thumb sucking at Jannali Dental Care

Did you know that your child’s thumb sucking can cause issues with their teeth and jaw?  We see quite a bit of it in our Jannali Dental Care practice with protruding teeth and problems with a kid’s bite when thumb sucking has gone on for too long.

 Why do some children suck their thumb?

Up until the age of about four months a baby will suck just about anything placed in their mouth.

Being able to suck from the moment they’re born is an essential survival skill to help babies feed. This is why babies have evolved a sucking reflex which can even be seen while a baby is still in utero.

Thumb sucking is generally accepted to be a calming or self-soothing habit, which most children give up in their own due course around the ages of two to four years.

However, if thumb sucking continues later into the teeth-forming years it can cause teeth and jaw issues.

When should my child stop sucking their thumb?

It is thought by some experts that thumb sucking doesn’t become a major issue until adult teeth start erupting around the age of eight. However, the earlier you nip thumb and finger sucking in the bud the less likely your child is to develop later problems.

Thumb sucking is perfectly normal in young children and most will naturally stop on their own by the age of four. However, if your child continues to suck their thumb or other fingers beyond this age it is time to look at solutions.

Thumb sucking – what are the consequences?

Most thumb sucking is completely harmless and has no lasting effects. The degree of damage done to the teeth and jaw depends on the frequency, length and strength of thumb sucking.

Some of the consequences of thumb sucking include protruding upper front teeth, or overbite;  back-tilting lower front teeth from strong thumb sucking; and open bite where front lower and upper teeth don’t make contact on biting; crossbite; possible palate damage; and more rarely speech issues or a lisp.

How can you stop your child from sucking their thumb?

While most children stop thumb sucking on their own, others require extra encouragement. Thumb sucking is frequently a comforting or soothing action used by a child, so it is important to consider the reasons behind their thumb sucking rather than just trying to break the habit. Kindness, patience and positive reinforcement is the best path to helping your child give up thumb sucking.

There are techniques to discourage thumb sucking such as being aware of the triggers – such as fear, anxiety, distress.   And then finding other ways of comforting your child, use toys or games as distractions when they suck their thumb, or consider other deterrents like band-aids, gloves or thumb guards.

What help is available?

If you’re feeling unsure, talk to your dentist about your child’s thumb sucking. At Jannali Dental Care we have  seen this hundreds of times before and while it may feel like your child will never stop sucking their thumb, there are lots of things you can do, and with your help, they will quit eventually.

 But above all, don’t stress.  And remember the thumb sucking habit is healthy in infants, toddlers and even pre-schoolers. It simply serves as a coping and comfort mechanism that is part of normal development.

If you have any concerns about  your child’s thumb sucking habit and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is the best option – and rest assured we will look after you and your family, from Grandparents to babies.

Fluoride: The good and the bad

fluoride and water

This month’s blog is all about fluoride. Fluoride sometimes (unfairly) gets a bad wrap. But it does have advantages and disadvantages, so if you’d like to know more about how fluoride, in the right quantities, helps keep your teeth healthy, then read on below.

What is fluoride?

Fluoride is a naturally occurring substance which strengthens and protects our teeth and bones. In many countries, including Australia, fluoride is added to drinking water and is present in many dental hygiene products.

While some groups argue against the use of fluoride, if used correctly there is no reason it should cause you or your family any harm.

What are the risks?

When used correctly, fluoride is highly beneficial in dental care. However, like many other beneficial substances, too much fluoride can be detrimental, in the same way that an overdose of Vitamin C or even too much water can be harmful.

So, how much is too much?

The World Health Organisation recommends no more than 1.5mg of fluoride per litre, which Australia currently recommends in its Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Around 70% of the Australian population currently has access to fluoridated water.

Fluoride is also present in many dental products such as toothpaste, mouthwash and dental floss, as well as trace elements of fluoride found in food, water, soil, rocks and air. In some places naturally high and unsafe levels of fluoride occur in ground water. When too much fluoride is taken in there are some detrimental effects which can occur.

The most common risk associated with fluoride is Fluorosis.

Dental Fluorosis

Dental fluorosis is a discolouration of tooth enamel caused by over-mineralisation from excessive fluoride exposure. Dental Fluorosis damage tends to occur while teeth are still developing, in the first 8 years of life, which makes it very important to monitor fluoride intake levels in young children.

Dental fluorosis is a cosmetic problem, so while it leads to  discolouration, which presents as white patches or streaks on your teeth, or sometimes brown marks, teeth will still be strong and healthy.

Skeletal fluorosis

Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease brought on by excessive exposure to fluoride. It eventually causes bones to become hard and brittle, making them more prone to factures and breakages and may also lead to stiff joints.

Skeletal fluorosis is highly unlikely to occur from normal dental processes and drinking water.  It is most prevalent in India and China where there can be very high naturally occurring levels of fluoride in the groundwater, along with other factors like industrial exposure, which can lead to a higher prevalence of skeletal fluorosis.

Other potential problems which may be associated with fluoride include:

·       Hyperthyroidism

·       Neurological problems

·       Skin problems such as acne

·       Cardiovascular issues

·       Bone and joint issues including osteoarthritis

It is important to remember that a normal, safe amount of fluoride will have ABSOLUTELY NO ILL EFFECTS on your health.  And it will have plenty of positive ones.

What are the benefits?

While its misuse may lead to unwanted side effects, safe and controlled use of fluoride is highly beneficial for your teeth. It strengthens teeth and aids repairs to help avoid cavities.

Simply by brushing your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste and by drinking fluoridated water you can gain the following benefits:

Enamel remineralisation: when your tooth enamel loses minerals, it becomes weakened and more prone to cavities. Fluoride swoops in and re-mineralises your tooth enamel, depositing calcium and other minerals to strengthen the enamel.

Decay: fluroide reduces the early signs of tooth decay and reduces the growth of certain bacteria

Acid control: fluoride increases the ability of your teeth to fight off acid attack

Improved enamel quality: fluoride taken when our teeth are still developing in early childhood helps create stronger enamel which is more resistant to  demineralisation.

Who should use fluoride?

No matter what stage of life you’re at, everyone can benefit from fluoride. It is so easy to keep your fluoride intake up and give your teeth a healthy boost. You can keep your fluoride levels up by:

·       Brushing your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste

·       Drinking fluoridated water, if available

·       Taking fluoride supplements if fluoridated water is not readily available

·       Having a fluoride treatment at your dentist.

While it’s recommended everyone makes fluoride part of their dental health routine, it is particularly important if any of the following apply to you:

·       If you are prone to or have a history of cavities and tooth decay

·       If you have a diet high in sugar

·       If you have limited access to dental services

·       If you’ve had dental procedures such as braces or crowns.

Fluoride plays a key role in the health of your teeth, and now that you know of its importance, you can include it in your oral care habits.

If you have any questions then please don’t hesitate to talk to us at your next Jannali Dental Care appointment.  We are here to help you because the quality of your oral hygiene is SO important to your overall health and well-being.

Call us anytime on 95289204 for a checkup or to discuss any dental concerns!

Is a Dental Implant right for me?

implant Jannali Dental Care

Are you struggling to eat apples or corn on the cob with a missing tooth?  If that’s a ‘yes’, then dental implants may be the perfect option for you.

Dr Brian has placed hundreds of implants in his career.  His experience and understanding of oral surgery and dental implants gives him a leading edge and Brian ensures a great outcome for all his patients.

What is a Dental Implant?

Dental implants are used to replace missing teeth and have been a successful option for several decades.

The implant is a small titanium alloy screw which connects a replacement tooth to the jawbone. Dental implants allow for strong, permanent, natural-looking replacement teeth.

Not only do they offer you the opportunity to improve the aesthetic of your mouth and smile, they also provide a high-quality solution to patients who have lost teeth through a sporting accident, or gum disease, or significant dental decay.

They Look And Feel Just Like The Real Thing

Dental implants are designed to be as close to natural teeth as possible in structure and appearance. You – or anyone else – won’t be able to tell the difference.

You will be able to speak, smile and eat with confidence.

High Success Rate, Lasting Effect

If you’re tired of having to return to the dentist because of nagging dental issues, implants may be the best option for the long term. The vast majority of implants are successful and give patients decades of quality wear.

Perfect Solution after a Root Canal

Dental implants can be a perfect solution after a root canal.  With root canal procedures the entire tooth and its roots are removed, leaving a void in your jawbone. Over time these voids degrade the strength of your jaw. With dental implants, the implant fills that void and strengthens the overall structure of your jaw.

Eat Confidently and Without Pain

Anyone who’s ever suffered with brittle teeth, dental sensitivity or a cavity knows how painful and difficult eating and drinking can be. Unlike dentures, dental implants provide the strength and grip to allow you to bite through and chew anything with confidence and no pain.

Zero Decay Issues

While  natural teeth are subject to several potential risks of decay, implants are structurally resilient and won’t become brittle or develop cavities over time. Zero decay!

It’s a Fairly Painless Procedure

While the thought of it probably sounds daunting, dental implant procedures are less painful than a tooth extraction. You’ll also heal much quicker and be able to return to normal life in almost no time after the procedure.

Cost Effectiveness

There’s no point beating about the bush: dental implants are not cheap.

The important thing to remember is that dental implants last a lifetime and replacing a tooth now can prevent further problems down the road.

Not to mention you will avoid that awful feeling and inconvenience of getting food stuck in the gap – or other chewing and tooth alignment issues if teeth shift in your mouth.

Your health insurance may be able to help contribute to the cost of your dental implants.  So be sure to check in with them and also talk to us about whether it’s the right option for you.

Dental implants can be a great investment but they aren’t suitable for everyone (including smokers, pregnant women and teeth grinders).  So if an implant is NOT right for your personal circumstances, you may need to speak to us about an alternative solution.

If you’d like to explore your options and think they might involve dental implants – then give us a call at ️9528 9204 or contact us online for an appointment.

The hidden danger in your mouth. Are you a grinder?

Grinding teeth

Do you ever wake up in the morning with an aching jaw or a headache?

If this happens to you on a regular basis, there’s a good chance you are grinding your teeth in your deep sleep – and you don’t even realise you are doing it.

A significant part of our population in modern world grinds their teeth from time to time including kids, teenagers and adults.

Some of us could be regular, forceful tooth grinders.  Ouch!

This is the sort of chronic teeth grinding that can become problematic.  It can also be very noisy so you may find yourself unpopular with your sleeping partner or room-mate!

 

 

What IS teeth grinding?

 

Teeth grinding is otherwise known as bruxism (yep it’s a word that you don’t hear used too often – unless you work in a dental practice!)

Bruxism is defined as the involuntary clenching, gnashing and grinding of your teeth.

If your teeth are in contact too often or too forcefully, you can, over time wear down your tooth enamel – the outer layer that protects your tooth. Dental research says our teeth should only be in contact for two minutes in any 24 hour period.

If the second layer, the dentin, becomes exposed this can lead to tooth sensitivity. Without the enamel to protect your teeth, you can end up with some serious (and potentially costly) dental problems.

Symptoms of teeth grinding

 

You can be a ‘bruxer’ and not know it!  There are several tell-tale signs to look for:

Headaches or pain in the jaw joint

Aching teeth – particularly in the morning or after waking up

Teeth that are sensitive to hot or cold temperatures

Stiffness in the face (or temples) immediately after waking up

Teeth marks (indentations) on the tongue

Chipped or cracked tooth enamel

Loose teeth

Ear-ache

Grinding sounds whilst sleeping

Noticeably clenching the jaw when stressed or anxious

Painful jaw-joints or radiating neck pain.

 

Causes of teeth grinding

 

Stress

 Anxiety and depression

 Sleep disordered breathing in kids and adults

 Misaligned teeth or bite

 Alcohol, smoking, high caffeine intake

 Some medications including antidepressants and amphtetamines.

Other causes ….

 

While stress and anxiety have been identified as THE most common cause, there is new evidence to suggest another culprit.  Sleep apnoea.

Sleep apnoea is now considered to be strongly associated with chronic tooth grinding.

In this case, the grinding has less to do with stress.  As your body cycles through the various stages of sleep, many of your muscles relax.   For some people, relaxing the jaw and tongue obstructs their airway.

The physical act of clenching the jaw and grinding teeth actually serves to reopen the airway. In that sense, tooth grinding is a sort of automatic measure of self-preservation.  It allows you to continue breathing.

Sleep apnoea can be a serious problem. So if it turns out that your tooth grinding is related to a sleeping disorder, it is of utmost importance that you contact your local specialist or doctor trained in sleep medicine.

Treatment options

 

At Jannali Dental Care we can help patients who suffer from persistent teeth grinding. ✅✅✅

 We will ask you some questions and check your teeth for wear and any damage, as well as check the muscles in and around your jaw.

While there are no quick-fixes or medications to stop bruxism, Dr Brian would offer the following options to control your teeth grinding and prevent it from causing further damage to your teeth and jaws:

occlusal splint or night-guard,

relaxation of jaw-muscles with heat/cold application,

muscle relaxant injection (botox) in jaw muscles, or

referral to a specialist for a sleep study and related treatment.

If you think you grind your teeth, or you know someone who does, then CALL US at the clinic on (02) 9528 9204 or email us at info@jannalidentalcare.com.au OR click HERE to leave us a message and we will call you back.

Teeth grinding is not something to simply ignore.

How often do you floss?

Did you know that less than 5% of the Aussie population regularly floss their teeth?

And many of us floss just twice a year – the night before our 6 monthly dental check-up.

DOES THAT SOUND LIKE YOU?  It is so common I have even given this habit it’s own special name –  the #guiltyfloss or also known as the #panicfloss. 

The Australian Dental Association encourages us to floss every day for a clean and healthy mouth – but if daily flossing is not realistic for you, then try to floss at least once a week. 

Flossing properly removes plaque and food particles where a toothbrush simply can’t reach.  (Even if you are the most diligent tooth-brusher EVER!)

Between your teeth and under your gum line there is a place that is very hard to reach; and a buildup of plaque in those unreached areas can make your gums inflamed, lead to gum disease, tooth decay and even tooth loss – in extreme cases.

So don’t just floss when food gets stuck.  I am going to ask you to make it part of your routine.  Just like cleaning your teeth, or having a daily shower. Or watching the latest Game of Thrones.

In order to get the most benefit out of your flossing,  just follow these 4 simple steps:

  1. Get a piece of floss approximately 30cm in length and wrap it around both middle fingers, with more on one finger than the other. Leave 5 or 10cm of floss to utilise.
  2. Hold the dental floss tightly between your thumb and index finger, slide it between your teeth up-and-down gently.
  3. Glide the dental floss between your teeth using a zig-zag motion, making sure to go gently beneath the gum line. Do not use too much pressure and cause bleeding or damage your gums.
  4. Move from tooth to tooth, repeating the process and DO NOT FORGET your very back teeth!  I know its dark back there, but they also deserve some love.

Floss picks have also grown in popularity the last few years, and are pretty easy to use if you prefer.  Dental water jets are another way to encourage flossing.

But good old floss is just as effective – and cheaper. And in many ways, better.

Should I stop flossing if my gums bleed?

 

Seeing blood when you floss can be a little scary, but some bleeding is totally normal. It’s definitely not a reason to quit flossing.

Bleeding can also alert you to some potential problems. Some people bleed because they’re flossing too enthusiastically. If you bleed alot, try to be gentler and see whether you bleed less.

People with gum disease bleed more than others when they floss. Take a close look at your gum line and see whether it looks inflamed. If you think you might have gum disease, give us a call at our Jannali Dental practice on  9528 9204 so we can check it out.

Does flossing make receding gums worse?

 

There’s no truth to the myth that flossing exacerbates receding gums.

In fact, flossing can actually prevent gums from receding, since it cleans food particles and bacteria from below the gum line. That makes flossing CRUCIAL for people with hereditary receding gums and gingivitis.

If your gums are already receding, flossing daily can help prevent further damage.

Bear in mind though that over-zealous flossing CAN be hazardous to gum recession so speak to us if you need advice on your flossing technique.

Be thorough, but be gentle.

Should I still floss if I have braces?

 

So you, or your child has braces?  I am the first to agree that braces can make flossing challenging. But failing to floss for the months or years that you have braces is a bad idea.

Just imagine how much food and bacteria will be stuck between your teeth by the time you get your braces off!   (And yep it could be a bit smelly too.)

If you find flossing with braces difficult, let us at Jannali Dental Care help you perfect your technique.  Remember, we are here to guide and help you with you oral hygiene.

We hope with these helpful tips that flossing becomes an easier, more routine process for you.

Remember that a dental checkup is still necessary even if you practice good oral hygiene at home, so contact the best dentist in Jannali, today!  That’s us, Jannali Dental Care, of course!

Give us a call on  (02)  9528 9204 to make an appointment OR if you’d rather not ring, feel free to email us at info@jannalidentalcare.com.au OR click HERE to leave us a message and we will call you back.

Does your mouth feel dry like the Sahara Desert?

If you’ve ever dealt with chronic dry mouth, then you know how distracting and uncomfortable the condition can be.

Dry mouth arises when the mouth’s saliva glands don’t produce adequate amounts of saliva. It can result from a number of causes including smoking, certain medications, dehydration, depression or anxiety, cancer therapy, or autoimmune disorders.

No matter what the cause of dry mouth, the consequences are discomfort and a heightened risk of tooth decay and gum disease. That’s because saliva plays an extremely important role in our oral health, from cleaning the mouth to helping protect teeth from decay.

And if you don’t produce adequate saliva, you’re more likely to experience difficulty chewing and swallowing, bad breath, dry or cracked lips, cavities, and/or infections of the tongue, cheeks, or gums. Not nice.

Let’s talk about some of the common causes……

1.   Medications 

Dry mouth can often be a side effect of medication.

These medications are not limited to just prescription drugs – even some over-the-counter medications can make your mouth feel dry.  Antidepressants, antihistamines, decongestants, pain medication and BP medication, can also exacerbate a dry mouth.

If one of these medications is responsible for your symptoms, sometimes your doctor can put you on a different medication or possibly lower the dosage.

Dry mouth can also be caused by medical treatments such as radiotherapy, or some surgeries.  It can also be a direct result of a medical condition (for example diabetes, lupus, or blocked salivary glands).

So if you suffer from a consistently dry and uncomfortable mouth, always mention it to your doctor and your dentist.

2. Dehydration

One of the most obvious causes of dry mouth is simple dehydration.

We recommend drinking at least 8 glasses of water a day but the best rule of thumb is to listen to your body and drink water even before you feel thirsty, especially when in the heat and/or exercising.

3. Smoking & Alcohol 

If you notice your dry mouth flares up after you’ve been smoking or drinking, that’s because both alcohol and tobacco dry out your mouth and inhibit saliva production.

It’s best you quit smoking altogether for reasons we all know too well.  And if you are consuming alcohol, ensure you’re drinking water between your drinks.  Common sense really.

If you like using a mouthrinse, be sure to buy an alcohol-free mouthwash. Alcohol, even in a mouthwash form, can cause a dry mouth.

Some foods, especially acidic salty and spicy foods can also impact the severity of dry mouth symptoms.

What can help ease the discomfort?

Some people find that sipping water, and sucking (sugar-free) sweets or chewing gum, can help in the short term to help produce saliva.  A water based lip moisturiser can also help.

Minimise sugary and acidic drinks, and brush and floss EVERY day.  It’s pretty simple.

There are also a variety of pastes and gels on the market so ask us about those when you see us at your next dental checkup.

How can Jannali Dental Care help you?

We will thoroughly examine your mouth and consider your medications and medical history to pinpoint the root cause, and suggest treatment customised to your individual dental needs.

Remember, you have a higher risk of tooth decay and gum disease with dry mouth, and these can get worse more quickly than usual. So it is important to visit your dental team regularly.

If you are suffering from dry mouth give us a call on  (02)  9528 9204 to make an appointment. OR if you’d rather not ring, feel free to email us at info@jannalidentalcare.com.au OR click HERE to leave us a message and we will call you back.

There is no need for you to go on suffering with any sort of dry mouth discomfort!