Amalgam fillings – fact versus fiction

amalgam filling at Jannali Dental Care

Replacing mercury fillings with white fillings

Can you believe that those silver-coloured fillings called ‘amalgam’ have been around since 1812?   Yes, they were created by a British chemist more than 200 years ago!

Amalgam is a very specific mixture of metals.  It consists of liquid mercury and a powdered alloy of silver, tin, and copper. They bind together to form a putty, which quickly sets. After being positioned in the tooth hole, it sets to form a strong filling.

These days, many clients request to have their old silver amalgam fillings replaced with white fillings, mainly for aesthetic reasons but sometimes for a perceived health risk.

Is there a safety issue with amalgam fillings?

No, there is no safety issue.

The issue that concerns many people is the health risk of leaking mercury from the silver fillings. However, the mercury of the amalgam is bound together to the tin and copper, so once it’s set, there’s no liquid mercury present anymore.

At Jannali Dental Care we see hundreds of amalgam fillings every day.  Many of them have been in mouths for 10 or 20 years.

Rest assured, amalgam doesn’t pose a health risk. It’s safe for adults, as well as children who are six and over. The Australian Dental Association continues to support the use of amalgam fillings. However, they suggest minimising their use in pregnant or breastfeeding women, by children under 6, and by people with kidney disease.

Rest assured the weight of evidence doesn’t establish any association between amalgam and any adverse health effects.

If the old fillings are in good condition with no decay beneath them, we do not generally recommend their removal.

Dental aesthetics

There are a number of reasons why amalgam fillings are not used anymore.

White fillings are definitely more aesthetically appealing. It’s not very attractive to have silver fillings in your teeth, particularly if they show when you smile.

With advancements in technology, these days dentists have more aesthetic materials on offer.  Composite resin and porcelain last just as long as amalgam if done properly.

If a client wishes to replace the old silver filling for aesthetic reasons then we are very happy to do so.

Filling Break Down

Sometimes the old silver fillings start to break down as they come to the end of their longevity. This simply means that the interface between the filling and the tooth is starting to separate. If there are gaps occurring, this allows bacteria to get into that space and create a potential cavity.

So please don’t panic, it’s not the mercury that’s leaking — it’s just the fillings breaking down.

The best filling is no filling at all

There’s no real urgency in getting the old amalgam’s filling replaced unless the silver filling is not doing the job it was designed to do.

Most importantly, rest assured that you’re not going to be poisoned by the old filling.

So the take-home message here is that the best filling is no filling at all!  Just remember daily brushing, flossing and practice good oral hygiene!

If you have any concerns about your fillings, or any oral health issue,  please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option. Your teeth are important and we want to help you keep your mouth in the best possible shape. 

Understanding gum disease. What to look for and how to treat it.

treating gum disease at Jannali Dental Care

You would not live with a chronic eye or ear infection, would you?

Yet 45% of the population over 65 years live with a chronic infection known as gum disease, or periodontitis.

If left untreated, gum disease can lead to tooth loss and the infection can actually spread throughout the body. Research shows that gum disease is associate with heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and even pre-term delivery in pregnancy.

From these studies, it has been shown that men with gum disease are 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer, 54% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30% more likely to develop blood cancers. Very good reasons to take care of your gums.

Most people don’t realise they have this disease – but it is a serious, and very treatable, infection.

The good news is that gum disease can be treated!

For years it was thought that the bacteria linked to gum disease was linked to other disease in the body. Current research now shows that in fact it’s inflammation which is responsible for the link. Therefore treating gum disease and the inflammation will not only help manage periodontal diseases, but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

Gum disease is often silent. That means that the symptoms may not actually appear until the disease has advanced to a more severe stage.

What are the warning signs?

 

Red, swollen, or tender gums – or other pain in your mouth
Bleeding while brushing, flossing or eating hard food (don’t panic, some bleeding while flossing is ok)
Pus between your gums and teeth
Sores in your mouth
Gums that are receding or pulling away from your teeth
Loose or separating teeth
Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth
A change to the way your teeth fit together in your mouth.

What is the treatment?

 

The treatment for gum disease depends on the severity.

For starters, coming to see us at Jannali Dental Care and having a full checkup with one of our dentists, is a great way to assess your gum health.

You can get your gums healthy again. If you have mild to moderate disease, it can be treated simply with regular brushing, flossing, mouthwash, and regular check-ups with us including frequent dental cleanings. It may also help to review your diet and lifestyle choices. Quitting smoking would also go along way towards healthier gums.

With more severe cases, specific treatment is required. The treatment can vary from sub gingival cleaning to referral for treatment by a periodontist for severe infections.

If gum disease is not caught soon enough, sometimes it is necessary to replace natural teeth with implants, restorations, bridges, or even dentures.

Remember, gum disease IS preventable. But let’s make sure we catch it early.

If you have any concerns about your gums, or any oral health issue, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option. Your teeth are important so let us help you keep them ship-shape. ❤️

How Vitamins and Minerals affect your Teeth

vitamins and minerals and oral health at Jannali Dental Care

Have you ever considered how vitamins and minerals affect your teeth? We’re all aware of how bad sugar is for teeth, and we know to avoid acidic food and drinks, but what can we eat to make our teeth stronger?

Consuming a broad range of vitamins and minerals is essential for maintaining our overall health. There is a range of vitamins and minerals  that are especially important for maintaining healthy teeth and bones.

Here’s some information about the eight most important ones.

Calcium

Calcium is a vital component of healthy teeth and bones. Consuming the right amount will help maintain the strength of your teeth and is particularly important for growing new teeth, so children especially need to monitor their calcium intake.

Dairy products like milk, cheese and yoghurt are abundant calcium sources. Plant based options include soy products, leafy greens, nuts and beans.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D has many benefits, most importantly it increases the body’s ability to absorb calcium. It increases teeth and bone mineral density, and is essential for strong, healthy teeth and bones.

The easiest way to get your daily does of vitamin D?  Sunshine!

Most Australians get enough vitamin D from incidental sun exposure by spending a few minutes outdoors each day. You’ll also find vitamin D in some fish including salmon and tuna, mushrooms and soy milk. You can also find vitamin D enriched products such as cereals and dairy products.

It is good to be mindful of your vitamin D exposure, because Aussies are so indoctrinated (and rightly so) with using daily sunscreen and avoiding sun damage, that vitamin D deficiency is becoming more and more common.

Potassium

Similar to vitamin D, Potassium helps improve your bone mineral density. This mineral will help keep your teeth strong and also contributes to keeping your blood from becoming overly acidic, a complication of which is a loss of calcium from bones and teeth.

Bananas are probably the best known source of potassium but it’s also present in potatoes, avocados, tomatoes and prunes.

B Vitamins

Vitamins B2, B3 and B12 all help prevent the development of mouth ulcers.

Of course the most famous and one of the richest sources of some B vitamins is good old Vegemite, but you’ll also find them in red meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, almonds and spinach.

⭐Vitamin C

Vitamin C supports a strong immune system and also improves our body’s ability to heal and repair itself. This vitamin prevents inflammation and repairs our body’s connective tissues. It also strengthens our gums, aiding the prevention of gingivitis, gum disease and tooth loosening or loss.

Vitamin C is found in a large array of fruits and vegetables including citrus, capsicum, broccoli, cauliflower and leafy greens such as spinach.

Phosphorus

Phosphorus helps improve the effect of calcium in creating strong bones and teeth.

Seafood such as salmon, tuna, sardines and prawns, is rich in phosphorus. It is also found in pork, beef, cheese, lentils, pumpkin seeds and soybeans.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K helps support bone strength by aiding the body in producing osteocalcin, which is a protein hormone related to bone density.  It also helps the body’s healing processes, and helps promote a healthy mouth.

Eat leafy greens like spinach and kale, parsley, brussel sprouts and broccoli to get your daily dose of vitamin K.

Vitamin A

Having a dry mouth can lead to tooth decay, which makes vitamin A vital in supporting oral health. This vitamin promotes mucus membrane health which in turn prevents dry mouth and aids the mouth’s ability to heal.

Vitamin A is abundant in orange fruits and vegetables including rockmelon, carrots, pumpkin, apricots and sweet potatoes. It’s also present in fish, leafy greens and eggs.

Protect your teeth from the inside out

Vitamins and minerals are essential to building and maintaining strong, healthy teeth. No matter how much we brush and floss our teeth if we aren’t getting the essential vitamins and minerals we’re only doing half the job!

If your dental care routine includes:

  1.       A balanced and varied diet rich in vitamins and minerals
  2.       Twice daily brushing and flossing
  3.       Regular visits with your dentist

Then your teeth should love  you back for many years to come.

If you have any concerns about your teeth, mouth or gums, or any oral health issue,  please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option. Your teeth are so important so let us help you to look after them. 

Dental x-rays, the who, the what, and the why?

dental x-ray at Jannali Dental Care

A dental x-ray is one of the most important diagnostic tools in a dentist’s arsenal. And they are safer and simpler than ever before –  quick, painless, and modern x-rays emit very low-radiation. 

And, most importantly, an x-ray allow us to assess a number of dental conditions.  Even though we may have a keen eye and loads of experience, there are still some things that even the very best dentist cannot see with just the naked eye.

What are dental x-rays?

Have you noticed how quickly an x-ray appears on the dentist’s screen?  Modern x-rays are digital and INSTANT.  Pretty amazing technology.

Not only do they allow for immediate viewing and diagnosis, they emit around 30% to 40% less radiation than traditional dental x-rays.

Dental x-rays are used for check-ups (usually every two years) and for diagnostic purposes.  We don’t need to take x-rays at every appointment.

Specialist x-rays like OPG and CBCT (described below), are used when more detailed or specialised imagery is needed.

CBCT

A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or Cone Beam Scan, is a precise method of x-ray used to create a 3D image of a patient’s mouth, teeth and jaw. This type of x-ray can be used for root canal, dental implants and gum disease assessment.

OPG

An orthopantomogram (try pronouncing that one!), or OPG, is a specialist x-ray which provides a 360-degree view of the teeth, jawbones, joints and sinuses. This type of x-ray may be required for braces preparation, dental implants, investigating gum disease, wisdom tooth removal or gaining a detailed picture of how a patient’s teeth fit into their jaw.

What are dental x-rays useful for?

Even the most experienced and eagle-eyed dentist can’t spot everything with the naked eye. An x-ray can help detect dental problems which are hidden beneath the surface or establish the extent of an infection.

Decay

If tooth decay is suspected by your dentist an x-ray can confirm its presence and the extent of the decay.

Infections and Abscesses

Abscesses and infections can be detected using dental x-rays. While your dentist may be able to establish that you have an infection during a regular check-up, a dental x-ray will establish the extent of the infection or abscess.

It gives us a much better idea of what is going on in your mouth.

Preparation and progress

Dental x-rays can be used to help prepare and assess the progress of patients for things such as braces, wisdom teeth extraction, dental implants and other cosmetic procedures which require a clear and detailed picture.

Are dental x-rays safe?

A dental x-ray every two years, or even more frequently, poses no health risk and the benefits to your dental health far outweigh any risk from exposure to the radiation emitted by the x-ray.

Modern digital x-rays, as opposed to traditional radiographic x-rays, emit a much lower level of radiation. At Jannali Dental Care, we only use digital x-rays – but if in doubt, always check with your dentist.

When are children able to have dental x-rays?

There is no general rule about when children can start to have x-rays.

A dentist will typically administer an x-ray on a child if they suspect particular dental health issues, or if that child is at high-risk of developing a dental issue.

Radiation levels can be lowered for child x-rays, but they are not given as a routine necessity as is the case in an adult check-up, usually only when they are needed as a diagnostic tool.

Are dental x-rays dangerous for pregnant women?

The Australian Dental Association says that x-rays are safe during all stages of pregnancy.

However, extra precautions are recommended during the first three terms of pregnancy and generally at Jannali Dental Care, our dentists will avoid routine preventative x-rays during pregnancy and only use them if required for more urgent diagnostic purposes.

The patient does of course have the right to refuse an x-ray if she feels it is not in her best interest.

How often should I get a dental x-ray?

Dental x-rays are recommended every two years as part of your check-up. Prevention is always better than cure and dental x-rays can pick up issues which can be missed by the eyes of even the most experienced dentist.

Some patients may require x-rays more frequently if they have a history of tooth decay or are at a high risk of dental problems.

X-rays are also administered if a patient presents with pain or other symptoms of infection or decay.

An xray can be just the thing that identifies and allows us to fix the problem that may be well-hidden to the naked eye.

If you have any concerns about dental xrays or any oral health issue, and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option.

Thumb sucking. Can it impact my child’s teeth?

Thumb sucking at Jannali Dental Care

Did you know that your child’s thumb sucking can cause issues with their teeth and jaw?  We see quite a bit of it in our Jannali Dental Care practice with protruding teeth and problems with a kid’s bite when thumb sucking has gone on for too long.

 Why do some children suck their thumb?

Up until the age of about four months a baby will suck just about anything placed in their mouth.

Being able to suck from the moment they’re born is an essential survival skill to help babies feed. This is why babies have evolved a sucking reflex which can even be seen while a baby is still in utero.

Thumb sucking is generally accepted to be a calming or self-soothing habit, which most children give up in their own due course around the ages of two to four years.

However, if thumb sucking continues later into the teeth-forming years it can cause teeth and jaw issues.

When should my child stop sucking their thumb?

It is thought by some experts that thumb sucking doesn’t become a major issue until adult teeth start erupting around the age of eight. However, the earlier you nip thumb and finger sucking in the bud the less likely your child is to develop later problems.

Thumb sucking is perfectly normal in young children and most will naturally stop on their own by the age of four. However, if your child continues to suck their thumb or other fingers beyond this age it is time to look at solutions.

Thumb sucking – what are the consequences?

Most thumb sucking is completely harmless and has no lasting effects. The degree of damage done to the teeth and jaw depends on the frequency, length and strength of thumb sucking.

Some of the consequences of thumb sucking include protruding upper front teeth, or overbite;  back-tilting lower front teeth from strong thumb sucking; and open bite where front lower and upper teeth don’t make contact on biting; crossbite; possible palate damage; and more rarely speech issues or a lisp.

How can you stop your child from sucking their thumb?

While most children stop thumb sucking on their own, others require extra encouragement. Thumb sucking is frequently a comforting or soothing action used by a child, so it is important to consider the reasons behind their thumb sucking rather than just trying to break the habit. Kindness, patience and positive reinforcement is the best path to helping your child give up thumb sucking.

There are techniques to discourage thumb sucking such as being aware of the triggers – such as fear, anxiety, distress.   And then finding other ways of comforting your child, use toys or games as distractions when they suck their thumb, or consider other deterrents like band-aids, gloves or thumb guards.

What help is available?

If you’re feeling unsure, talk to your dentist about your child’s thumb sucking. At Jannali Dental Care we have  seen this hundreds of times before and while it may feel like your child will never stop sucking their thumb, there are lots of things you can do, and with your help, they will quit eventually.

 But above all, don’t stress.  And remember the thumb sucking habit is healthy in infants, toddlers and even pre-schoolers. It simply serves as a coping and comfort mechanism that is part of normal development.

If you have any concerns about  your child’s thumb sucking habit and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is the best option – and rest assured we will look after you and your family, from Grandparents to babies.

Fluoride: The good and the bad

fluoride and water

This month’s blog is all about fluoride. Fluoride sometimes (unfairly) gets a bad wrap. But it does have advantages and disadvantages, so if you’d like to know more about how fluoride, in the right quantities, helps keep your teeth healthy, then read on below.

What is fluoride?

Fluoride is a naturally occurring substance which strengthens and protects our teeth and bones. In many countries, including Australia, fluoride is added to drinking water and is present in many dental hygiene products.

While some groups argue against the use of fluoride, if used correctly there is no reason it should cause you or your family any harm.

What are the risks?

When used correctly, fluoride is highly beneficial in dental care. However, like many other beneficial substances, too much fluoride can be detrimental, in the same way that an overdose of Vitamin C or even too much water can be harmful.

So, how much is too much?

The World Health Organisation recommends no more than 1.5mg of fluoride per litre, which Australia currently recommends in its Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Around 70% of the Australian population currently has access to fluoridated water.

Fluoride is also present in many dental products such as toothpaste, mouthwash and dental floss, as well as trace elements of fluoride found in food, water, soil, rocks and air. In some places naturally high and unsafe levels of fluoride occur in ground water. When too much fluoride is taken in there are some detrimental effects which can occur.

The most common risk associated with fluoride is Fluorosis.

Dental Fluorosis

Dental fluorosis is a discolouration of tooth enamel caused by over-mineralisation from excessive fluoride exposure. Dental Fluorosis damage tends to occur while teeth are still developing, in the first 8 years of life, which makes it very important to monitor fluoride intake levels in young children.

Dental fluorosis is a cosmetic problem, so while it leads to  discolouration, which presents as white patches or streaks on your teeth, or sometimes brown marks, teeth will still be strong and healthy.

Skeletal fluorosis

Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease brought on by excessive exposure to fluoride. It eventually causes bones to become hard and brittle, making them more prone to factures and breakages and may also lead to stiff joints.

Skeletal fluorosis is highly unlikely to occur from normal dental processes and drinking water.  It is most prevalent in India and China where there can be very high naturally occurring levels of fluoride in the groundwater, along with other factors like industrial exposure, which can lead to a higher prevalence of skeletal fluorosis.

Other potential problems which may be associated with fluoride include:

·       Hyperthyroidism

·       Neurological problems

·       Skin problems such as acne

·       Cardiovascular issues

·       Bone and joint issues including osteoarthritis

It is important to remember that a normal, safe amount of fluoride will have ABSOLUTELY NO ILL EFFECTS on your health.  And it will have plenty of positive ones.

What are the benefits?

While its misuse may lead to unwanted side effects, safe and controlled use of fluoride is highly beneficial for your teeth. It strengthens teeth and aids repairs to help avoid cavities.

Simply by brushing your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste and by drinking fluoridated water you can gain the following benefits:

Enamel remineralisation: when your tooth enamel loses minerals, it becomes weakened and more prone to cavities. Fluoride swoops in and re-mineralises your tooth enamel, depositing calcium and other minerals to strengthen the enamel.

Decay: fluroide reduces the early signs of tooth decay and reduces the growth of certain bacteria

Acid control: fluoride increases the ability of your teeth to fight off acid attack

Improved enamel quality: fluoride taken when our teeth are still developing in early childhood helps create stronger enamel which is more resistant to  demineralisation.

Who should use fluoride?

No matter what stage of life you’re at, everyone can benefit from fluoride. It is so easy to keep your fluoride intake up and give your teeth a healthy boost. You can keep your fluoride levels up by:

·       Brushing your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste

·       Drinking fluoridated water, if available

·       Taking fluoride supplements if fluoridated water is not readily available

·       Having a fluoride treatment at your dentist.

While it’s recommended everyone makes fluoride part of their dental health routine, it is particularly important if any of the following apply to you:

·       If you are prone to or have a history of cavities and tooth decay

·       If you have a diet high in sugar

·       If you have limited access to dental services

·       If you’ve had dental procedures such as braces or crowns.

Fluoride plays a key role in the health of your teeth, and now that you know of its importance, you can include it in your oral care habits.

If you have any questions then please don’t hesitate to talk to us at your next Jannali Dental Care appointment.  We are here to help you because the quality of your oral hygiene is SO important to your overall health and well-being.

Call us anytime on 95289204 for a checkup or to discuss any dental concerns!

Our 2020 commitment to our patients

our new 2020 resolutions at jannali dental care

At the beginning of a new year, many of us set goals to have a healthier lifestyle.  We’ve all heard it……more yoga, less wine, more flossing, less Facebook etc etc etc.

At Jannali Dental Care we thought we’d mix things up a little and make some of our own resolutions for the new decade.

We spent some time brainstorming over a cuppa, and our 2020 resolutions are all about how our practice can best support YOU – our valued patients.

Here is our top 10 list – And PLEASE let us know if you think there is anything else we should add to make your dental experience an even better one.


At Jannali Dental Care we resolve to:

 

  • Always meet you with a friendly hello and a warm smile whenever you walk through our door;
  • Respect your schedule. We ensure that your appointment starts when scheduled and ends when you expect it to;
  • Respect your concerns. We know dentistry makes some people anxious. We do our best to make your visits as comfortable as possible;
  • Respond to you in a timely way, and in a way that answers any issues you have;
  • Give maximum value, giving top-notch dental services at competitive prices;
  • Stay up-to-date on current dental knowledge and techniques through ongoing education and training, and the latest technology;
  • Follow the industry-standard, or above, to provide a hygienic environment for your dental care;
  • Honestly analyse your need for treatment, and discuss viable alternatives, before making recommendations;
  • Give you a full understanding of your treatment, including accurate information on the cost.
  • Treat everyone fairly and equally, regardless of age, race, religion, creed, ethnicity, socio-economic background, or current health;
  • Continue our involvement with the local Jannali community.  We think ‘giving back’ is VERY important so expect to see us out there in 2020 and beyond.


And here’s what you can do:

 

Of course, now it’s your turn.  We have a few suggested 2020 resolutions for you!

  • Brush and floss regularly. But you already knew this, right? Oh, and that rumour about flossing extending your life, it’s true.  So, go on, floss like a boss.
  • Buy new toothbrushes four times a year. Toothbrushes have a lifespan of about three months. Making a swap at the new year will help keep your teeth clean for the next three months, and by Easter, it will be time to get another one.
  • Check-in with us. Hmmmm, if we had a dollar for every patient who said ‘I wish I’d come in earlier’, we’d be buying our own private island in the Caribbean right now.       Regular check-ups and cleans are a vital party of maintaining your dental health, and they are a resolution you can keep. Schedule your regular dental check-ups for the year, and you will be set to go!  And if you are nervous about coming to see us, remember we have twilight dentistry options (and Netflix).
  • Eat and drink properly. Avoid sugars, carbohydrates, and acids to make your dental health resolution successful. Drinking water with your snack, and rinsing after eating, make it more difficult for food to stick to your teeth.  Drink more water.  And don’t touch fizzy drinks – there are simply no winners there.
  • Quit smoking.  Say no more.
  • Reduce alcohol and coffee intake. There are multiple ways alcohol can harm your teeth. Alcohol is empty calories with high amounts of sugar to cause decay, and coffee and red wine stain your teeth.
  • Smile. We saved the easiest and quickest 2020 resolution for last. Did you know that even if you fake a smile it releases chemicals that will trick your brain and actually make you feel better TRUE.

You will be surprised how these simple tips will make a difference to your teeth, your gums and your overall general health.

And remember, even if you are ‘best friends’ with your toothbrush it’s really important to keep up with regular professional cleans and check-ups.  Nothing cleans your teeth like we do!

At Jannali Dental Care we want our practice to feel like family – so give us a call on 9528 9204 or contact us right here for an appointment. We promise we will always take good care of you and your smile.

Is a Dental Implant right for me?

implant Jannali Dental Care

Are you struggling to eat apples or corn on the cob with a missing tooth?  If that’s a ‘yes’, then dental implants may be the perfect option for you.

Dr Brian has placed hundreds of implants in his career.  His experience and understanding of oral surgery and dental implants gives him a leading edge and Brian ensures a great outcome for all his patients.

What is a Dental Implant?

Dental implants are used to replace missing teeth and have been a successful option for several decades.

The implant is a small titanium alloy screw which connects a replacement tooth to the jawbone. Dental implants allow for strong, permanent, natural-looking replacement teeth.

Not only do they offer you the opportunity to improve the aesthetic of your mouth and smile, they also provide a high-quality solution to patients who have lost teeth through a sporting accident, or gum disease, or significant dental decay.

They Look And Feel Just Like The Real Thing

Dental implants are designed to be as close to natural teeth as possible in structure and appearance. You – or anyone else – won’t be able to tell the difference.

You will be able to speak, smile and eat with confidence.

High Success Rate, Lasting Effect

If you’re tired of having to return to the dentist because of nagging dental issues, implants may be the best option for the long term. The vast majority of implants are successful and give patients decades of quality wear.

Perfect Solution after a Root Canal

Dental implants can be a perfect solution after a root canal.  With root canal procedures the entire tooth and its roots are removed, leaving a void in your jawbone. Over time these voids degrade the strength of your jaw. With dental implants, the implant fills that void and strengthens the overall structure of your jaw.

Eat Confidently and Without Pain

Anyone who’s ever suffered with brittle teeth, dental sensitivity or a cavity knows how painful and difficult eating and drinking can be. Unlike dentures, dental implants provide the strength and grip to allow you to bite through and chew anything with confidence and no pain.

Zero Decay Issues

While  natural teeth are subject to several potential risks of decay, implants are structurally resilient and won’t become brittle or develop cavities over time. Zero decay!

It’s a Fairly Painless Procedure

While the thought of it probably sounds daunting, dental implant procedures are less painful than a tooth extraction. You’ll also heal much quicker and be able to return to normal life in almost no time after the procedure.

Cost Effectiveness

There’s no point beating about the bush: dental implants are not cheap.

The important thing to remember is that dental implants last a lifetime and replacing a tooth now can prevent further problems down the road.

Not to mention you will avoid that awful feeling and inconvenience of getting food stuck in the gap – or other chewing and tooth alignment issues if teeth shift in your mouth.

Your health insurance may be able to help contribute to the cost of your dental implants.  So be sure to check in with them and also talk to us about whether it’s the right option for you.

Dental implants can be a great investment but they aren’t suitable for everyone (including smokers, pregnant women and teeth grinders).  So if an implant is NOT right for your personal circumstances, you may need to speak to us about an alternative solution.

If you’d like to explore your options and think they might involve dental implants – then give us a call at ️9528 9204 or contact us online for an appointment.

Oral Hygiene and Diabetes

DIABETES and Oral health at Jannali Dental Care

 

 

Diabetes is the epidemic of the 21st century and one of the biggest challenges confronting Australia’s health system.

1.7 million Aussies have diabetes. Maybe one of the 1.7 million is you, or someone you care for or love.💖

It is a serious condition that requires constant management and if you live with diabetes, you are also more prone to oral health issues including gum disease, tooth infections and tooth decay.

It’s not all bad news – it simply boils down to a little extra care.✔️

 

Which oral health problems are people with diabetes more prone to?

 

Gum disease
Tooth decay
Oral infections
Dry or burning mouth

Why are diabetics at higher risk?

 

There are a few factors which explain why a bit of extra dental care is needed:

Glucose levels in saliva – People with diabetes have higher blood glucose levels, and this also applies to their saliva. High glucose levels in saliva means more sugar for bad bacteria to feed on, which contributes to gum disease, tooth decay and oral infections.

Medications 💊- Some diabetes medications can cause dry mouth. Dry mouth, apart from being uncomfortable, can lead to oral infections, and particularly oral thrush. Diabetic medications can also cause taste changes such as a metallic flavour.

Hypo treatments – Fizzy drinks, lollies and other sweet things🧁 used to treat hypo episodes are loaded with sugars and acids which can damage teeth.

How can people with diabetes protect their teeth?

 

The risk factors associated with diabetes mean people with diabetes need to exercise a little more care than most.

Luckily, most of the care is common sense and easily managed.

Keep blood glucose levels in check✔️ – all diabetics should be doing this regardless, and this also helps with dental and oral care. Make sure you stay up to date with your target glucose levels and keep them in order.

Eat healthy food 🍌🍎🍓– avoid excess sugars and acidic food and drink.

Establish a good oral care routine 🦷– teeth and gums should be brushed at least twice a day and floss should be used to clean between teeth and help prevent gum disease.

Stay hydrated🥛 – by drinking lots of water and chewing a sugar-free gum you can avoid dry mouth symptoms.

Quit smoking 🚬– this is an excellent thing to do for your general health anyway, but it will also help prevent dry mouth and lower your risk of gum disease, tooth decay and infection.

Brush your teeth after consuming sugar 🧁– if you have to treat a ‘hypo episode’ with sugary products make sure you clean your teeth thoroughly afterwards.

Visit your dentist regularly 🦷– every six months. Remember to keep your dentist up to date with your medical history and any changes in your health.

Prevention is always better than cure; keeping on top of your oral health now can save you a lot of pain and bother in the future.

If you have any other questions about diabetes management, check out the Diabetes Australia website. They have a tonne of great resources. 👍👍👍

Give Jannali Dental Care a call if you would like to talk to us more about oral hygiene with diabetes, or if you need an appointment to discuss any matters concerning your smile.

How often do you floss?

Did you know that less than 5% of the Aussie population regularly floss their teeth?

And many of us floss just twice a year – the night before our 6 monthly dental check-up.

DOES THAT SOUND LIKE YOU?  It is so common I have even given this habit it’s own special name –  the #guiltyfloss or also known as the #panicfloss. 

The Australian Dental Association encourages us to floss every day for a clean and healthy mouth – but if daily flossing is not realistic for you, then try to floss at least once a week. 

Flossing properly removes plaque and food particles where a toothbrush simply can’t reach.  (Even if you are the most diligent tooth-brusher EVER!)

Between your teeth and under your gum line there is a place that is very hard to reach; and a buildup of plaque in those unreached areas can make your gums inflamed, lead to gum disease, tooth decay and even tooth loss – in extreme cases.

So don’t just floss when food gets stuck.  I am going to ask you to make it part of your routine.  Just like cleaning your teeth, or having a daily shower. Or watching the latest Game of Thrones.

In order to get the most benefit out of your flossing,  just follow these 4 simple steps:

  1. Get a piece of floss approximately 30cm in length and wrap it around both middle fingers, with more on one finger than the other. Leave 5 or 10cm of floss to utilise.
  2. Hold the dental floss tightly between your thumb and index finger, slide it between your teeth up-and-down gently.
  3. Glide the dental floss between your teeth using a zig-zag motion, making sure to go gently beneath the gum line. Do not use too much pressure and cause bleeding or damage your gums.
  4. Move from tooth to tooth, repeating the process and DO NOT FORGET your very back teeth!  I know its dark back there, but they also deserve some love.

Floss picks have also grown in popularity the last few years, and are pretty easy to use if you prefer.  Dental water jets are another way to encourage flossing.

But good old floss is just as effective – and cheaper. And in many ways, better.

Should I stop flossing if my gums bleed?

 

Seeing blood when you floss can be a little scary, but some bleeding is totally normal. It’s definitely not a reason to quit flossing.

Bleeding can also alert you to some potential problems. Some people bleed because they’re flossing too enthusiastically. If you bleed alot, try to be gentler and see whether you bleed less.

People with gum disease bleed more than others when they floss. Take a close look at your gum line and see whether it looks inflamed. If you think you might have gum disease, give us a call at our Jannali Dental practice on  9528 9204 so we can check it out.

Does flossing make receding gums worse?

 

There’s no truth to the myth that flossing exacerbates receding gums.

In fact, flossing can actually prevent gums from receding, since it cleans food particles and bacteria from below the gum line. That makes flossing CRUCIAL for people with hereditary receding gums and gingivitis.

If your gums are already receding, flossing daily can help prevent further damage.

Bear in mind though that over-zealous flossing CAN be hazardous to gum recession so speak to us if you need advice on your flossing technique.

Be thorough, but be gentle.

Should I still floss if I have braces?

 

So you, or your child has braces?  I am the first to agree that braces can make flossing challenging. But failing to floss for the months or years that you have braces is a bad idea.

Just imagine how much food and bacteria will be stuck between your teeth by the time you get your braces off!   (And yep it could be a bit smelly too.)

If you find flossing with braces difficult, let us at Jannali Dental Care help you perfect your technique.  Remember, we are here to guide and help you with you oral hygiene.

We hope with these helpful tips that flossing becomes an easier, more routine process for you.

Remember that a dental checkup is still necessary even if you practice good oral hygiene at home, so contact the best dentist in Jannali, today!  That’s us, Jannali Dental Care, of course!

Give us a call on  (02)  9528 9204 to make an appointment OR if you’d rather not ring, feel free to email us at info@jannalidentalcare.com.au OR click HERE to leave us a message and we will call you back.