Our top tips to get your kids to take care of their teeth.

kids choose their own toothbrush

Good oral hygiene starts as soon as you have teeth. But it can be tough to convince your 3-year-old that it’s time to turn off the cartoons and brush.

But oral hygiene is crucial for our kids. One in three Aussie kids are not brushing their teeth twice a day – which leaves them at risk of poor oral hygiene and dental related issues as they get older.

Here are a few simple tips to help get your kids brushing and create positive habits that hopefully last a lifetime.

Let your Kids Choose their Own Toothbrush

Kids want a little bit of control, and if you can let them have control over some aspects in life, it’s proven they’re more willing to engage in those activities.

Let your kids pick out their own toothbrush. Make it a fun activity that you do together. There are plenty of colours and fun designs these days.

You can also let them choose the kind of toothpaste they want to use. It stops them from having to use a toothpaste they don’t like the texture or taste of and places them in control of the dental hygiene process.

Brush Your Teeth Together (and make it fun)

Make this part of the day you spend together. Brush your teeth at the same time as your kids to show them that everyone brushes their teeth – it’s not a punishment. It’s a necessity.

Don’t stare boringly into the mirror, though. Add some fun.

Here are a couple suggestions :

  • Have your child copy you – turn it into a fun game
  • Hum a tune or dance to show that it doesn’t have to be so boring.

Playing a game together in the bathroom shows them that not only does everybody brush their teeth, but it doesn’t have to be a boring chore.

Plus, if you can find a way to distract them from the monotony of hygiene, then they’ll forget about the time lost and will be more likely to do it on their own.

Remember, kids should be supervised while brushing their teeth until they’re around eight years old.

Create a Rewards System

Rewards are excellent motivators for reinforcing good behavior. You’re also more likely to get the job done without tears if there’s something fun at the end.

Create a rewards chart. Keep track of the number of days they brush their teeth without complaining or having a meltdown. Let them see you add a sticker to their chart when they’ve done well!  OR let them choose and add the sticker to their own chart for an extra reward.

As they get older,  perhaps let them choose their own reward to work towards.

Little tots often need instant rewards. Offer another bedtime story as a reward for their good behavior.

Set up a Routine

Keep brushing teeth on a morning and evening schedule so kids know when to expect it. Such as straight after brekky, or right before bed.

By having them brush every day at the same time, they’ll know that there’s a dedicated time to brush and they shouldn’t expect to be doing anything else at the time.

It Takes a Team

It really does take a team to keep teeth healthy. Visit us at at Jannali Dental Care at least once a year and we can talk to you about how often your child should visit the dentist.

And remember, the Australian Government covers the dental costs of some children through Medicare. You can check whether your child is eligible on the Child Dental Benefits Schedule website or give us a 📞 call on 9528 9204 so we can help you.

Start those good habits early and your kids will thank you later!  I promise. 👏

What happens in the chair during your checkup and clean?

Jannali Dental Care checkup and clean

You’ve always wanted to know, right?

Pretty much everyone knows how important it is to have a routine dental clean.  And if you don’t know it yet, you certainly will after you read this blog.

Your regular dental clean has one primary goal: for us to get rid of all your plaque and tartar deposits.

Regardless of how thorough your home oral hygiene is, a regular checkup also give us an opportunity to examine your teeth and detect gum disease, inflammation, look for any holes in your teeth, or detect other more rare nasties like oral cancer.

Having your teeth cleaned every six months also helps keep bad breath at bay. And no one in their right mind wants bad breath.

So What Happens During Your Clean?

A professional teeth cleaning is way more thorough than what you do at home.

While daily brushing and flossing are great, it’s very difficult for you to reach plaque that is hiding between the teeth and along the gum line.

In the clinic, we use special tools to remove sticky plaque and hard tartar deposits from the surfaces of your teeth above your gums. And only a dental professional will be able to remove plaque that has hardened into tartar.

And after we’ve removed stubborn plaque and tartar, we polish your teeth enamel with a gentle abrasive paste.

Polishing the tooth makes it more difficult for plaque to accumulate before the next cleaning. It also helps your teeth feel clean and healthy. And it can remove surface stains so your smile shines a little brighter.

During this process we will  squirt some water into your mouth and ask you to swish.  The rinsing stage helps remove any residual tooth polish.

Finally we will floss your teeth. This will remove any plaque that could be lurking between teeth.  It also lets us know where gum bleeding occurs.

Last but not least, we apply a fluoride treatment to your teeth. This can protect your teeth from decay for months.

How Long Does a Teeth Cleaning Take?

A teeth clean can last between 30 minutes and one hour. During this time, you will lie back in a comfortable dental chair while we examine your teeth.

Remember at Jannali Dental Care we have Netflix to keep you, or your kids, distracted.  We know cleans can be a bit uncomfortable at times, so we try to be as gentle as we can.

The Examination

Once your teeth are all nice and clean, we conduct an examination.

In the past, dentists always used a metal probe and angled mirror – but now we use many different types of equipment to give your mouth the big once over.

We are looking for any signs of tooth decay and check for other issues with your gums like deep pockets, redness, or inflammation. We also take a squizz at your bite and jaw alignment.

We look for any issue, big or small.  Remember your mouth is the window to your overall health. Oral hygiene and a healthy mouth is very important.

Your appointment may take longer if we need to take X-rays or if we need to discuss options for treatment for something that needs attention.

It’s also a good time to ask us about areas of your mouth where your brushing and flossing routines might need a bit of help.

There are some common spots a lot of people miss when brushing their teeth so feel free to ask us where yours are.

We are here to help you keep your teeth in the best possible shape as you get older.  It’s sooooo true that a regular dental clean and check is just as important as an annual health check with your Doctor.

So now that you know what is involved, don’t let the year slip by without giving your mouth some love.💘

How do we keep our dental surgery clean?

dental ppe in Jannali Dental Care

There’s nothing like a freshly clean dental clinic.

And in these times, its doubly, trebly, important.  And we know for a fact that cleanliness is directly linked to positive patient outcomes.

Properly-Cleaned Tools and PPE

First and foremost at Jannali Dental we have VERY strict protocols for cleaning tools, and using clean, disposable PPE (personal protective equipment).

Masks and protective eye-wear are super important. When your mouth is being examined or operated on, we use a new disposable mask to avoid any bacteria from our mouth reaching yours. This is especially crucial when conducting surgery as there is always a heightened risk.

Gloves are a priority.  We always use disposable gloves and they are replaced frequently.  A fresh pair is put on right before an examination starts.

Before and after each patient, our dental tools undergo complete sterilisation. The mouth is a haven for bacteria, and even with a straightforward clean in a spotless mouth, we are digging through bacteria and plaque.

Finally, the chair and operating surfaces are completely cleaned and sterilised with sanitiser on all surfaces, before and after you leave. Bacteria can travel and grow across surfaces, so even an unclean chair can potentially lead to reinfection of a patient.

The contagious nature of Covid-19 has made this even more of a priority then ever before.

Staff Health and Immunisation

We firmly believe the health of our staff is paramount. While it’s always good practice to never go to work sick, in a dental office this is even more crucial as you risk infecting people who might be at a higher risk.

Our staff are up to date with immunisations and vaccines to ensure they don’t bring potentially harmful pathogens into a medically-sensitive environment.

Rest assured that all of our team is vaccinated against Covid-19, in accordance with the health guidelines. 

The Waiting Room and Reception

Patients go to a dentist expecting the office to be clean and fresh. A dirty waiting area is not a good sign for the rest of the practice.

A clean relaxed uncluttered waiting room will help you feel at ease and we try hard to make our reception area a nice place to wait.  We also want you to have faith that your dental records and other sensitive patient information is well looked after in an organised manner.

At Jannali Dental Care we take cleanliness VERY seriously (as we should!)

Our business is delivering the best oral health care that we can possibly achieve for our patients – and to fulfill that promise we maintain the highest possible standard of sterilisation, infection control, and disposal of single-use materials and tools.

We have made our practice as safe as we possibly can.

If you need an appointment, or simply catch-up on an overdue check-up, please give us a call on 📞9528 9204.  Lockdown doesn’t mean you can’t take time for your oral hygiene.

Dental Myth Busting with Jannali Dental Care

myth busters true or false

Tooth be told, there’s a lot of misconceptions when it comes to proper dental care and these sometimes fuel the lack of excitement when you see an upcoming dental appointment on your calendar.

And while its true that going to the dentist isn’t all fun and games, knowing the truth behind certain myths will certainly help your chances of maintaining good oral health.

👉Here’s FIVE of our favourite dental myth-busters:

1. If your teeth are white and look and feel fine, then you don’t need to see the dentist:

FALSE. Sure, it’s great to have healthy looking teeth, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a pesky hole forming that you cannot see or feel.

Dental visits and cleanings every 6-12 months will help keep your teeth looking and feeling healthy; and help to catch any beginning stages of gum disease or a cavity before it leads to pain.

Any person who tells you they only see a dentist when a tooth hurts, is doing themselves a big disservice. Straight perfectly white teeth are definitely not a substitute for poor oral health care.

2. They’re just baby teeth and will fall out anyway, so no need to see a dentist:

FALSE. One of the biggest misconceptions is that baby teeth don’t really matter, since they “just fall out”anyway.

On the contrary, baby teeth play a huge role in guiding the adult teeth in both direction and health. They foster good nutrition through proper chewing, and aid in speech development.

3. You don’t have to floss if you’re brushing regularly:

FALSE. When you don’t floss, you’re at risk for two major dental issues in your mouth: gingivitis, and cavities between your teeth, and you are not able to properly remove dental plaque buildup.

Brushing only cleans the visible parts of your teeth. Whereas flossing gets to all those tricky hard to reach areas.

Oh and brushing harder does not give you a better clean, that’s another myth! It can actually erode tooth enamel. We recommend using a soft-bristled brush and gently massaging your teeth and gums. Harder is NOT better.

Using an electric toothbrush does not stop the need for flossing either. It is still super important.

4. You can’t go to the dentist while you’re pregnant:

FALSE. Some mums-to-be assume that the dentist should be avoided while pregnant.

Tthere is no scientific basis for this. In fact, the vast majority of dental procedures are completely safe for pregnant women and the babies they’re carrying.

As we’ve said many times, our mouth is the gateway to our body. Bacteria, infection and other problems here can easily affect the rest of your health, which may affect your baby.

Additionally, pregnancy results in hormonal changes that can cause tooth and gum problems, so getting a dental check-up during pregnancy is not only safe but also incredibly important!

5. You can dissolve a tooth in Coca Cola In 24 hours:

FALSE. This is actually a big urban myth.

While there’s no question that Coke will deteriorate and stain your teeth, leaving a tooth in a coke can for 24 hours will not dissolve an entire tooth.

Coke is acidic and as much as I dislike what it does, it simply can’t make a tooth disappear. But remember, always keep soft drinks in moderation.

So there you go, that’s our top FIVE myth busters! 😜

Oral health education is a big part of what makes us tick at Jannali Dental Care. The more you know, the healthier your smile.

Avoiding decay with a sweet tooth

managng a sweet tooth at jannali dental care

Yes it would be VERY easy for me to say “just avoid sugar”.  But in an age of fast food, chocolate thick-shakes and Donut King, how does one do that?  It’s simply not realistic.

We live with sugar. It’s here and it is  not going away.

Here are my top three tips for preventing tooth decay if you have a sweet tooth.  Hope you find these helpful.

Tip Number One: ORAL HYGIENE

This one is a no-brainer.  Brush your teeth twice a day.

Small circles, angled at 45 degrees to your teeth and gently massage your gums while you brush. This mechanically removes any food residue still stuck to your teeth.

Use floss to clean the areas between your teeth. This is important as a toothbrush cannot reach these spots and food can easily get lodged and sit here for days causing bad breath, decay and gum infection.

When using floss make sure you contact the surfaces of your teeth to again mechanically remove bits of food stuck to them.

As much as I’d love you to floss every day, even once a week is better then nothing.

Tip Number Two: SUBSTITUTION

If you cook your own cakes and biscuits and jams, then try substituting white sugar with something like Xylitol.

This is a natural sugar and many studies have come out recently showing it actually STOPS decay from progressing through your teeth. It doesn’t spike blood sugar or insulin, starves the plaque-producing bacteria in your mouth and feeds friendly microbes in your digestive system.

There are also sugar alternatives out there for bodybuilders and diabetics so have a look at these products and see if they are suitable for you.

Another tip is avoid fruit juices and swap for the raw fruit version. Have an apple instead of slowly sipping on apple juice. Sugary juices are definitely not great for your teeth.

Tip Number Three: TIMING

Lots of studies have shown it is not necessarily the AMOUNT of sugar you have, but rather how FREQUENTLY you have it.

This is because when you frequently consume sugar throughout the day, you are not giving your saliva enough time to replenish itself and buffer the mouth from the acidity created from consuming the sugar.

So if you are going to have sugary foods and drinks, try and consume them during or after a main meal. Once you have had the sugary meal or drink, then that is it.   Don’t snack on sugary foods all day.

Of course during the course of every day, make sure you are having lots of veggies, protein and water.

I hope you have found this blog helpful.  These 3 tips are simple and pretty easy to follow – and they will help minimise the chance of decay.

If you need a caring dentist that won’t make you feel bad about having a sweet tooth, then give us a call at Jannali Dental Care on 9528 9204 OR book your appointment online right here.

We certainly won’t judge your sugar intake, but we may give you some tips to help manage it.

Amalgam fillings – fact versus fiction

amalgam filling at Jannali Dental Care

Replacing mercury fillings with white fillings

Can you believe that those silver-coloured fillings called ‘amalgam’ have been around since 1812?   Yes, they were created by a British chemist more than 200 years ago!

Amalgam is a very specific mixture of metals.  It consists of liquid mercury and a powdered alloy of silver, tin, and copper. They bind together to form a putty, which quickly sets. After being positioned in the tooth hole, it sets to form a strong filling.

These days, many clients request to have their old silver amalgam fillings replaced with white fillings, mainly for aesthetic reasons but sometimes for a perceived health risk.

Is there a safety issue with amalgam fillings?

No, there is no safety issue.

The issue that concerns many people is the health risk of leaking mercury from the silver fillings. However, the mercury of the amalgam is bound together to the tin and copper, so once it’s set, there’s no liquid mercury present anymore.

At Jannali Dental Care we see hundreds of amalgam fillings every day.  Many of them have been in mouths for 10 or 20 years.

Rest assured, amalgam doesn’t pose a health risk. It’s safe for adults, as well as children who are six and over. The Australian Dental Association continues to support the use of amalgam fillings. However, they suggest minimising their use in pregnant or breastfeeding women, by children under 6, and by people with kidney disease.

Rest assured the weight of evidence doesn’t establish any association between amalgam and any adverse health effects.

If the old fillings are in good condition with no decay beneath them, we do not generally recommend their removal.

Dental aesthetics

There are a number of reasons why amalgam fillings are not used anymore.

White fillings are definitely more aesthetically appealing. It’s not very attractive to have silver fillings in your teeth, particularly if they show when you smile.

With advancements in technology, these days dentists have more aesthetic materials on offer.  Composite resin and porcelain last just as long as amalgam if done properly.

If a client wishes to replace the old silver filling for aesthetic reasons then we are very happy to do so.

Filling Break Down

Sometimes the old silver fillings start to break down as they come to the end of their longevity. This simply means that the interface between the filling and the tooth is starting to separate. If there are gaps occurring, this allows bacteria to get into that space and create a potential cavity.

So please don’t panic, it’s not the mercury that’s leaking — it’s just the fillings breaking down.

The best filling is no filling at all

There’s no real urgency in getting the old amalgam’s filling replaced unless the silver filling is not doing the job it was designed to do.

Most importantly, rest assured that you’re not going to be poisoned by the old filling.

So the take-home message here is that the best filling is no filling at all!  Just remember daily brushing, flossing and practice good oral hygiene!

If you have any concerns about your fillings, or any oral health issue,  please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option. Your teeth are important and we want to help you keep your mouth in the best possible shape. 

Dental x-rays, the who, the what, and the why?

dental x-ray at Jannali Dental Care

A dental x-ray is one of the most important diagnostic tools in a dentist’s arsenal. And they are safer and simpler than ever before –  quick, painless, and modern x-rays emit very low-radiation. 

And, most importantly, an x-ray allow us to assess a number of dental conditions.  Even though we may have a keen eye and loads of experience, there are still some things that even the very best dentist cannot see with just the naked eye.

What are dental x-rays?

Have you noticed how quickly an x-ray appears on the dentist’s screen?  Modern x-rays are digital and INSTANT.  Pretty amazing technology.

Not only do they allow for immediate viewing and diagnosis, they emit around 30% to 40% less radiation than traditional dental x-rays.

Dental x-rays are used for check-ups (usually every two years) and for diagnostic purposes.  We don’t need to take x-rays at every appointment.

Specialist x-rays like OPG and CBCT (described below), are used when more detailed or specialised imagery is needed.

CBCT

A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or Cone Beam Scan, is a precise method of x-ray used to create a 3D image of a patient’s mouth, teeth and jaw. This type of x-ray can be used for root canal, dental implants and gum disease assessment.

OPG

An orthopantomogram (try pronouncing that one!), or OPG, is a specialist x-ray which provides a 360-degree view of the teeth, jawbones, joints and sinuses. This type of x-ray may be required for braces preparation, dental implants, investigating gum disease, wisdom tooth removal or gaining a detailed picture of how a patient’s teeth fit into their jaw.

What are dental x-rays useful for?

Even the most experienced and eagle-eyed dentist can’t spot everything with the naked eye. An x-ray can help detect dental problems which are hidden beneath the surface or establish the extent of an infection.

Decay

If tooth decay is suspected by your dentist an x-ray can confirm its presence and the extent of the decay.

Infections and Abscesses

Abscesses and infections can be detected using dental x-rays. While your dentist may be able to establish that you have an infection during a regular check-up, a dental x-ray will establish the extent of the infection or abscess.

It gives us a much better idea of what is going on in your mouth.

Preparation and progress

Dental x-rays can be used to help prepare and assess the progress of patients for things such as braces, wisdom teeth extraction, dental implants and other cosmetic procedures which require a clear and detailed picture.

Are dental x-rays safe?

A dental x-ray every two years, or even more frequently, poses no health risk and the benefits to your dental health far outweigh any risk from exposure to the radiation emitted by the x-ray.

Modern digital x-rays, as opposed to traditional radiographic x-rays, emit a much lower level of radiation. At Jannali Dental Care, we only use digital x-rays – but if in doubt, always check with your dentist.

When are children able to have dental x-rays?

There is no general rule about when children can start to have x-rays.

A dentist will typically administer an x-ray on a child if they suspect particular dental health issues, or if that child is at high-risk of developing a dental issue.

Radiation levels can be lowered for child x-rays, but they are not given as a routine necessity as is the case in an adult check-up, usually only when they are needed as a diagnostic tool.

Are dental x-rays dangerous for pregnant women?

The Australian Dental Association says that x-rays are safe during all stages of pregnancy.

However, extra precautions are recommended during the first three terms of pregnancy and generally at Jannali Dental Care, our dentists will avoid routine preventative x-rays during pregnancy and only use them if required for more urgent diagnostic purposes.

The patient does of course have the right to refuse an x-ray if she feels it is not in her best interest.

How often should I get a dental x-ray?

Dental x-rays are recommended every two years as part of your check-up. Prevention is always better than cure and dental x-rays can pick up issues which can be missed by the eyes of even the most experienced dentist.

Some patients may require x-rays more frequently if they have a history of tooth decay or are at a high risk of dental problems.

X-rays are also administered if a patient presents with pain or other symptoms of infection or decay.

An xray can be just the thing that identifies and allows us to fix the problem that may be well-hidden to the naked eye.

If you have any concerns about dental xrays or any oral health issue, and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is always the best option.

Thumb sucking. Can it impact my child’s teeth?

Thumb sucking at Jannali Dental Care

Did you know that your child’s thumb sucking can cause issues with their teeth and jaw?  We see quite a bit of it in our Jannali Dental Care practice with protruding teeth and problems with a kid’s bite when thumb sucking has gone on for too long.

 Why do some children suck their thumb?

Up until the age of about four months a baby will suck just about anything placed in their mouth.

Being able to suck from the moment they’re born is an essential survival skill to help babies feed. This is why babies have evolved a sucking reflex which can even be seen while a baby is still in utero.

Thumb sucking is generally accepted to be a calming or self-soothing habit, which most children give up in their own due course around the ages of two to four years.

However, if thumb sucking continues later into the teeth-forming years it can cause teeth and jaw issues.

When should my child stop sucking their thumb?

It is thought by some experts that thumb sucking doesn’t become a major issue until adult teeth start erupting around the age of eight. However, the earlier you nip thumb and finger sucking in the bud the less likely your child is to develop later problems.

Thumb sucking is perfectly normal in young children and most will naturally stop on their own by the age of four. However, if your child continues to suck their thumb or other fingers beyond this age it is time to look at solutions.

Thumb sucking – what are the consequences?

Most thumb sucking is completely harmless and has no lasting effects. The degree of damage done to the teeth and jaw depends on the frequency, length and strength of thumb sucking.

Some of the consequences of thumb sucking include protruding upper front teeth, or overbite;  back-tilting lower front teeth from strong thumb sucking; and open bite where front lower and upper teeth don’t make contact on biting; crossbite; possible palate damage; and more rarely speech issues or a lisp.

How can you stop your child from sucking their thumb?

While most children stop thumb sucking on their own, others require extra encouragement. Thumb sucking is frequently a comforting or soothing action used by a child, so it is important to consider the reasons behind their thumb sucking rather than just trying to break the habit. Kindness, patience and positive reinforcement is the best path to helping your child give up thumb sucking.

There are techniques to discourage thumb sucking such as being aware of the triggers – such as fear, anxiety, distress.   And then finding other ways of comforting your child, use toys or games as distractions when they suck their thumb, or consider other deterrents like band-aids, gloves or thumb guards.

What help is available?

If you’re feeling unsure, talk to your dentist about your child’s thumb sucking. At Jannali Dental Care we have  seen this hundreds of times before and while it may feel like your child will never stop sucking their thumb, there are lots of things you can do, and with your help, they will quit eventually.

 But above all, don’t stress.  And remember the thumb sucking habit is healthy in infants, toddlers and even pre-schoolers. It simply serves as a coping and comfort mechanism that is part of normal development.

If you have any concerns about  your child’s thumb sucking habit and its potential impact on their teeth, please give us a call on 9528 9204 or drop us an email info@jannalidentalcare.com.au

Talking to us is the best option – and rest assured we will look after you and your family, from Grandparents to babies.

5 Tips to Reduce Sugar and have a Healthy Diet

healthy diet with Jannali Dental care

Plaque is a thin, translucent film of horrible bacteria that coats the tooth surface. When sugar and starchy foods encounter plaque, it reacts with the bacteria to form acids that erode tooth enamel and cause decay. That’s it in a nutshell.

Naturally, more sugar you consume, the more acids are produced and over time this leads to more tooth decay.

A PERFECT STORM of ‘nasties’ for your teeth.

Reducing the amount of sugar in your diet is not only beneficial for your teeth but also your health in general. Healthy eating generally means a healthy life.

Here are 5 tips to slash sugar from your diet. Even just doing ONE of these is a good start.

TIP#1: OPT FOR A SUGAR FREE BREAKFAST

There are high levels of sugar in many brekky cereals so read the labels. Switching to lower level of sugar or no added sugar cereals will have a positive impact on your dental and overall health.

Go for unsweetened versions of common foods like oatmeal and fruits.

Be mindful of too many sultanas and raisins. They can get stuck in between the grooves and crevices of your teeth, where they cause decay.

Dried fruit/ fruit bars/ muesli bars are a perfect storm of stickiness and chewiness. The gooey bits are practically made for getting stuck between teeth and can be incredibly sweet. Bad combination.

TIP#2: RECOGNISE SUGAR CONTENT

Read food labels. So important.

5mg sugar is about 1 teaspoon. When a food says 25mgs sugar per serve, that’s approximately 5 teaspoons!

There are many hidden sugars in certain food items. Tomato sauce, salad dressings, condiments – all have sugar. Make sure you read the food label of the product where they have listed the contents and quantity of sugar. If it’s bad – simply don’t buy it.

Simples.

You will need to look for more than just the word ‘Sugar’ as it hides under various tricky names like sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, molasses and corn syrup.

TIP#3: BE SMART & SNACK WISELY

You have already eaten your breakfast and it’s still time for the lunch but you can’t stop craving something to eat.

Don’t rush out to Donut King for unhealthy options like donuts, cakes, lollies, biscuits and other sugary foods which cause tooth decay. Choose to snack smartly with fresh fruits, raw vegetables like carrots, cucumber or a handful of nuts which will provide that energy boost you need.

Remember to choose sugary food less often and avoid them between meals.

TIP#4: SAY YES TO HEALTHY DRINKS (and NO to the rest)

Sweetened drinks with high sugar content put you at a risk of tooth decay, weight gain and other health issues. Avoiding aerated or sugar drinks is a good idea but that is not the only sugar packed drink out there. Watch out for those energy drinks high in sugar and too much caffeine!

Don’t swish acidic drinks or hold them in your mouth – this exposes the teeth to acids for longer than necessary.

Make sure you try to moderate the amount of sugary drinks you consume and prefer healthy drinks like a smoothie, or even better, good old H2O.

TIP#5: HIT THE SACK EARLY

Brushing & flossing your teeth immediately after dinner serves as a reminder that you are not supposed to eat again.

The cool fresh toothpaste feeling in your mouth deters you from actually grabbing mid night snacks or scouting the refrigerator late for desserts and ice cream. Being a night owl can be detrimental so make sure you fix a time when you are supposed to head to the bed and stick to it.

Sometimes a cup of chai tea in the evening can help crave that evening sugar hit.

Don’t Forget…

Cutting down on sugar feels like an impossible task but your taste buds will adjust. And it doesn’t take long.

For your yogurt, mix half a serving of sweetened yogurt with half a serving of plain, and eventually move on to adding natural sweetness with fresh fruit.

If you normally put two sugars in your coffee, for instance, try one for a week, then half, and finally only add your milk.

You will be surprised how quickly you get used to dropping the amount of sugar in your diet – and doing yourself, your waistline, and your teeth, a huge favour.

It’ s a case of all in moderation. Enjoying a Mars Bar occasionally isn’t a bad thing BUT just don’t go overboard -and make sure you follow through with proper oral care after consuming that treat.

Make sure that you brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and an electric toothbrush, floss regularly and follow good oral hygiene. And of course, regular checkups with the crazy needle-phobic Jannali Dental Care Team.

We will look after you!

Fluoride: The good and the bad

fluoride and water

This month’s blog is all about fluoride. Fluoride sometimes (unfairly) gets a bad wrap. But it does have advantages and disadvantages, so if you’d like to know more about how fluoride, in the right quantities, helps keep your teeth healthy, then read on below.

What is fluoride?

Fluoride is a naturally occurring substance which strengthens and protects our teeth and bones. In many countries, including Australia, fluoride is added to drinking water and is present in many dental hygiene products.

While some groups argue against the use of fluoride, if used correctly there is no reason it should cause you or your family any harm.

What are the risks?

When used correctly, fluoride is highly beneficial in dental care. However, like many other beneficial substances, too much fluoride can be detrimental, in the same way that an overdose of Vitamin C or even too much water can be harmful.

So, how much is too much?

The World Health Organisation recommends no more than 1.5mg of fluoride per litre, which Australia currently recommends in its Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Around 70% of the Australian population currently has access to fluoridated water.

Fluoride is also present in many dental products such as toothpaste, mouthwash and dental floss, as well as trace elements of fluoride found in food, water, soil, rocks and air. In some places naturally high and unsafe levels of fluoride occur in ground water. When too much fluoride is taken in there are some detrimental effects which can occur.

The most common risk associated with fluoride is Fluorosis.

Dental Fluorosis

Dental fluorosis is a discolouration of tooth enamel caused by over-mineralisation from excessive fluoride exposure. Dental Fluorosis damage tends to occur while teeth are still developing, in the first 8 years of life, which makes it very important to monitor fluoride intake levels in young children.

Dental fluorosis is a cosmetic problem, so while it leads to  discolouration, which presents as white patches or streaks on your teeth, or sometimes brown marks, teeth will still be strong and healthy.

Skeletal fluorosis

Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease brought on by excessive exposure to fluoride. It eventually causes bones to become hard and brittle, making them more prone to factures and breakages and may also lead to stiff joints.

Skeletal fluorosis is highly unlikely to occur from normal dental processes and drinking water.  It is most prevalent in India and China where there can be very high naturally occurring levels of fluoride in the groundwater, along with other factors like industrial exposure, which can lead to a higher prevalence of skeletal fluorosis.

Other potential problems which may be associated with fluoride include:

·       Hyperthyroidism

·       Neurological problems

·       Skin problems such as acne

·       Cardiovascular issues

·       Bone and joint issues including osteoarthritis

It is important to remember that a normal, safe amount of fluoride will have ABSOLUTELY NO ILL EFFECTS on your health.  And it will have plenty of positive ones.

What are the benefits?

While its misuse may lead to unwanted side effects, safe and controlled use of fluoride is highly beneficial for your teeth. It strengthens teeth and aids repairs to help avoid cavities.

Simply by brushing your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste and by drinking fluoridated water you can gain the following benefits:

Enamel remineralisation: when your tooth enamel loses minerals, it becomes weakened and more prone to cavities. Fluoride swoops in and re-mineralises your tooth enamel, depositing calcium and other minerals to strengthen the enamel.

Decay: fluroide reduces the early signs of tooth decay and reduces the growth of certain bacteria

Acid control: fluoride increases the ability of your teeth to fight off acid attack

Improved enamel quality: fluoride taken when our teeth are still developing in early childhood helps create stronger enamel which is more resistant to  demineralisation.

Who should use fluoride?

No matter what stage of life you’re at, everyone can benefit from fluoride. It is so easy to keep your fluoride intake up and give your teeth a healthy boost. You can keep your fluoride levels up by:

·       Brushing your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste

·       Drinking fluoridated water, if available

·       Taking fluoride supplements if fluoridated water is not readily available

·       Having a fluoride treatment at your dentist.

While it’s recommended everyone makes fluoride part of their dental health routine, it is particularly important if any of the following apply to you:

·       If you are prone to or have a history of cavities and tooth decay

·       If you have a diet high in sugar

·       If you have limited access to dental services

·       If you’ve had dental procedures such as braces or crowns.

Fluoride plays a key role in the health of your teeth, and now that you know of its importance, you can include it in your oral care habits.

If you have any questions then please don’t hesitate to talk to us at your next Jannali Dental Care appointment.  We are here to help you because the quality of your oral hygiene is SO important to your overall health and well-being.

Call us anytime on 95289204 for a checkup or to discuss any dental concerns!